Category

Projects

Category

Coal Seam Gas: Keith’s Story

Keith shared his story about his Grandmother who was born near Bohena Creek, in the Pilliga forest (NSW). After learning he had never been to the area, I took him for a drive out there. We sat in the yellow sands of the creek bed under the Sun. Keith dug his hands into the sand and said he had never felt so close to his Grandmother. I soon realised Keith didn’t know that Santos had plans to pollute Bohena creek with CSG wastewater. After trying my best to deliver tragic news in a peaceful way, Keith sat under the shade of a tree, shattered. The emotion you see in Keith in this film is a result of the news he just heard.

Please sign the petition to clear NSW of the threat that coal seam gas brings to land, water and communities:ย http://bit.ly/2tz7ivC

Beautiful Sunshine

We follow Melbourne based musician Allara, a young Yorta Yorta woman, on her journey to reconnect with her family and culture. Along her journey, Allara learns of her family’s ongoing fight for recognition as the Traditional Owners of southern New South Wales and northern Victoria. This is a story to inspire all, but in particular, to encourage and exhilarate younger generation Indigenous Australians to maintain and re-connect with their families and Country, encouraging a traditional flow of language, culture and history while sharing a strength to heal from the intergenerational trauma many Indigenous people feel, caused through colonisation. The documentary, Beautiful Sunshine, is appropriately titled after the direct translation of Allara’s Aboriginal name.

Enquiring Minds

We warmly invite you to this Aboriginal Australian sensory experience event. Performance, Dance, Speakers, Conversation, Exhibition, Australian Native Foods & Wine. Join the growing Enquiring Minds community & be apart of the conversation.

Great Australia bight right whale study

The Great Australian Bight is a calving ground and nursery for Right Whales. This short film captures epic displays of the whales and discusses conservation efforts of marine biology PhD student, Claire Charlton, who is monitoring population trends off the coast of South Australia.

The future of the Riviera Maya

The Riviera Maya on the Caribbean coastline of Mexico is connected to the world’s second largest coral reef, the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef. The cave systems of the area are recognised as the most extensive in the world and represent the largest natural supply of freshwater for the people of the Yucatan Peninsula.

In recent years, the breathtaking natural beauty of the Riviera Maya has become a global development hotspot for a burgeoning tourist industry. This scenic destination is suffering as resorts are rapidly expanding across the coastline with little to no long-term strategic or sustainable planning. Many developments have minimal to no wastewater treatment. This film explores local solutions to remediate these issues.

The pulse of a coral reef

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, the Traditional Owners of the Great Barrier Reef region, have lived in harmony with the land and sea for over 60,000 years. Yet in the last 30 years, the Great Barrier Reef has lost over 50% of its coral cover. By 2050, this could decrease to less than 5% percent.

How can we adapt our current management strategies to support a more harmonious and sustainable future with the Great Barrier Reef? In this film, we connect visual footage of animals and their sounds, using sound recordings as a way to determine the health of our changing Great Barrier Reef. This film will investigate the latest technological developments in reef management and determine how changes to our marine environments, such as ocean acidification, rising temperatures, increased shipping, storm events and invasive species could impact on communities that rely on the survival of the reef.

Farmer Incubator

Through their Pop-Up Garlic Farmer programs and workshops, Farmer Incubator’s participants are giving new farmers the opportunity to access the world of agriculture by providing them with access to land, resources and mentorship in order to experience growing a crop on a larger scale than their backyard.

Mirrdinjar

Uncle Bunna Lawrie, a Mirning elder and Whale Dreamer from the Nullarbor coast teaches us about ‘Mirrdinjar’ through words and song. “Mirrdinjar is about honouring respect for the ocean and Earth and thanking it for all it provides.” As BP developed their plans to drill for oil off the Nullarbor coast, Uncle Bunna Lawrie reminds us that the Earth, land and sea, are integrated and need to be looked after for all to survive.

Fortunately, BP have pulled out of the Great Australian Bight, only to leave other oil hungry giants in their place.